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Safety Services

Coronavirus and the Workplace

By Business Insurance, Group Benefits, HR Services, Safety Services

Compliance Issues for Employers

 

As the number of reported cases of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to rise, employers are increasingly confronted with the possibility of an outbreak in the workplace.

Employers are obligated to maintain a safe and healthy work environment for their employees, but are also subject to a number of legal requirements protecting workers. For example, employers must comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) in their approach to dealing with COVID-19.

There are a number of steps that employers can take to address the impact of COVID-19 in the workplace. In addition to reviewing the compliance concerns outlined in this Compliance Bulletin, employers should:

• Closely monitor the CDC, WHO and state and local public health department websites for information on the status of the coronavirus.
• Proactively educate their employees on what is known about the virus, including its transmission and prevention.
• Establish a written communicable illness policy and response plan that covers communicable diseases readily transmitted in the workplace.
• Consider measures that can help prevent the spread of illness, such as allowing employees flexible work options like working from home. are enforced.
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Control Your Mod

By Business Insurance, Insurance, Safety Services

Top 10 Ways To Control Your Mod

Your experience modification factor, or mod, is an important component used in calculating your workers’ compensation premium. If you can control your mod, you can lower your price — so we’ve gathered top tips to help you impact your bottom line.

 

  1. Investigate accidents immediately and thoroughly; take corrective action to eliminate hazards, and be aware of fraud.
  2. Report all claims to your carrier immediately. Alert the carrier to any serious, potentially serious or suspect claims. Frequently monitor the status of the claim, and communicate with the adjuster to resolve them as quickly as possible.
  3. Take an aggressive approach to providing light duty to all injured employees upon their release from treatment. Supervise light duty employees to ensure their conformance with restrictions.
  4. In serious cases that involve lost time, communicate with the claims adjuster to demonstrate your interest in returning the injured employee back to gainful employment.
  5. Set safety performance goals for those with supervisory responsibility. Success in achieving safety goals should be used as one measure during performance appraisals.
  6. Develop a written safety program, and train employees in their responsibilities for safety. Incorporate a disciplinary policy into the program that holds employees accountable for breaking rules or rewards them for correctly following safety procedures.
  7. Frequently communicate with employees, both formally and informally, regarding the importance of safety.
  8. Make safety a priority – senior management must be visible in the safety effort and must support improvement.
  9. Evaluate accident history and near-misses at least monthly. Look for trends in experience, and take corrective action on the worst problems first.
  10. Talk to your BHI Advisor, Account Manager, or Director of Risk Control to ensure success.

BHI is Insurance. Done Differently.

By Business Insurance, Group Benefits, HR Services, Insurance, Personal Insurance, Safety Services


John Boykin
President & CEO
BHI

Business owners have so much on their plate these days, and many times the last thing on their mind is insurance. As a business owner, what do you think about when someone says the word “insurance”? Does it bore you? Do you roll your eyes? When was the last time you reviewed your insurance portfolio? Even the word itself has a bit of an outdated and traditional undertone. We get it, and we’re doing everything we can to change the market and our client and prospects’ antiquated outlook on “insurance.” We believe it’s one of the most important pieces to put in place for business continuity and not worthless paper stacked on a shelf that you hope you never have to use!

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We Are BHI

By Business Insurance, Employee Benefits, HR Services, Personal Insurance, Safety Services

We are BHI

An independent insurance agency that provides Insurance,
Benefits, Human Resources, and Safety Solutions
to businesses and individuals in
the mid-Atlantic and beyond.

 

 

We’re here when you need us most.
Call, email or stop by.
111 Ruthar Drive
Newark, DE 19711
Phone: 302-995-2247
Fax: 302-995-2220
Insurance@BHI365.com

 

OSHA: Employee Discipline, Drug Testing, and Incentive Programs

By Safety Services

On May 12, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule, including anti-retaliation provisions, requiring certain employers to electronically submit data from their work-related injury records to OSHA. On Oct. 19, 2016, OSHA published an interpretation of how the anti-retaliation provisions affect employee discipline, drug and alcohol testing, and safety incentive programs.

The Anti-Retaliation Provisions

According to OSHA, the final rule clarifies existing law regarding employee anti-retaliation protections. Specifically, OSHA’s anti-retaliation provisions:

  • Require employers to inform employees that they have a right to report work-related injuries and illnesses free from retaliation;
  • Direct employers to adopt reasonable procedures (“not unduly burdensome” and does not “deter or discourage”) that employees can use to report work-related injuries and illnesses; and
  • Prohibit employers from retaliating against employees solely because they report work-related injuries or illnesses.

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Post Your OSHA Injury Summary by Feb. 1

By Business Insurance, Safety Services

Reminder: Employers Must Post Injury/Illness Summary Beginning February 1

Posting Requirement

OSHA reminds employers of their obligation to post a copy of OSHA’s Form 300A, which summarizes job-related injuries and illnesses logged during 2017. Each year, between February 1 and April 30, the summary must be displayed in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees and those in certain low-hazard industries are exempt from OSHA recordkeeping and posting requirements. Visit OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule webpage for more information on recordkeeping requirements. Read More